Systems


Currently showing a full list of all machines owned.
Click HERE for a shorter list, showing only one of each model.

Elbox
A1200T

Elbox tower custom made for the Amiga 1200, also called the "Power Tower". It houses a Winner Z4 busboard and Mediator 1200 Z4.

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Checkmate Digital
A1500

Checkmate Digital, a UK based company designed this desktop casing for the Amiga 500. It included options for internally mounting side expansions, a seperate keyboard and there was even a topcase option for extra expansion room. In an answer to this machine C= UK introduced the Amiga 1500.

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CompZ
A2000T

Very big, sturdy tower case designed to take the A2000s motherboard and all possible expansion cards. Adjustable Mhz display provides CPU speed rating.

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Micronik
A3000T

Micronik sold these tower kits for all models Amiga, from 500 to 4000. This kit includes a rev9 Amiga 3000 mainboard and a Micronik Zorro 3 busboard. Tower is in good condition, with door still intact.

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Micronik
A4000T

Machine based on a standard A4000 desktop mainboard this machine offered more expansion space. Included a different Zorro BusBoard with 7 Zorro slots.

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Eagle
A4000T

Eagle was one of the companies allowed to sell Amigas under their own brandname. This machine is based on the original Amiga 4000T mainboard, in an Eagle case (standard AT tower).

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Index Systems
Access

Built by Index Systems, the Access is basically a redesigned Amiga. Loosely based on Amiga 1200 parts: it includes a 68EC030 CPU, 8MB of Fast Mem and a VGA output. It is build in a 5.25inch form factor. It was marketed towards point-of-sale machines.

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Index Systems
Access

Second Access system. These machine were sold by Computer City in Rotterdam, very few were ever released for sale.

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Magicbox
Alphagen

The Magicbox Alphagen is a character generator sold in the US. It is based on an Amiga 1200 mainboard, included is a DCE Typhoon MK2 turbocard with 4MB of fast memory including a SCSI controller. This is used for connecting a flatbed scanner. It is mounted in a black rackmount case.

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Commodore
Amiga CD32

The CD32 was the worlds first 32bit game console. Loosely based on the A1200 architecture it was AGA based. Unlike the CDTV the CD32 had little connectors for adding peripherals. Later an FMV module was released enabling the CD32 to play MPEG (Video) CDs.

Clean machine used primarily for games.

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Commodore
Amiga CD32

This is a Engineering Pilot Build/prototype model of the CD32. It has a rare rev. 2 mainboard and an early kickstart version.

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Commodore
Amiga CDTV

One of the very first true Multimedia machines, Commodore bet on the computer in the living room. Unfortunatly it wasnt a big success. The CDTV is based on the Amiga 500 with added ROMS for CD support and all flashy screens for playing Audio CDs

Includes Mouse, Trackball, Remote, Floppy, Keyboard and CD caddys all in black.

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MacroSystem
Draco Cube

The Draco was the first Amiga Compatible computer. It was designed by MacroSystem after Commodore's bankruptcy. It is based on a busboard, a CPU board that also holds a modified Kickstart 3.1 chip and the SCSI and I/O ports. Graphics is based on a modified Retina Z3 and for Video Editing a modified VLab Motion.

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Newtek
Video Toaster 2000

Newtek never sold these machines directly, its a 2000 with a label attached over the left side of the frontpanel. The label covers up the Commodore Amiga logo and power/HD led panel. Dealers fitted the Video Toaster hardware and attached the sticker, but the inside remains a normal Amiga 2000.

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Commodore
Amiga 500

The entry level Amiga. A follow up to the Amiga 1000 the 500 became the biggest selling Amiga of all. Originally equipped with a 68000 CPU at 7,14Mhz and OCS and later ECS chipset.

Very early rev 3 A500

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Commodore
Amiga 500

The entry level Amiga. A follow up to the Amiga 1000 the 500 became the biggest selling Amiga of all. Originally equipped with a 68000 CPU at 7,14Mhz and OCS and later ECS chipset.

Rev 6A mainboard, the most common version of the A500

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Commodore
Amiga 500

The entry level Amiga. A follow up to the Amiga 1000 the 500 became the biggest selling Amiga of all. Originally equipped with a 68000 CPU at 7,14Mhz and OCS and later ECS chipset.

Rev 6A mainboard, has a rare hebrew keyboard!

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Commodore
Amiga 500

A german version of the A500, designed by Stefanie Tucking. This is the version with the leopard print. These were only sold in Germany.

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Commodore
Amiga 500

A german version of the A500, designed by Stefanie Tucking. This is the version with the coloured balls print. These were only sold in Germany.

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Commodore
Amiga 500

Revision 3 machine

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Commodore
Amiga 500


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Commodore
Amiga 500

Includes a kickstart switch with 1.2, 1.3 and 2.04 ROM's

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Commodore
Amiga 500


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Commodore
Amiga 500

Later 500 model with a different label, like the A500+. Has a rev 8a motherboard but is not equipped like the 500+

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Commodore
Amiga 500

This Amiga comes in the original Class of the 90's pack. Designed by Commodore UK this pack was built around a standard Amiga 500 and included lots of software for learning.

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Commodore
Amiga 500+

A revamped version of the A500. This machine came with 1MB chipram expandible to 2MB, Real Time Clock and ECS chipset. Was to be replaced with the A600.

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Commodore
Amiga 500+

The Amiga 500+ was a cross between the A500 and the A600. Because of it's newer kickstart (and more chipram) it was not 100% compatible to the A500. This is a boxed machine in the UK Cartoon Classics pack.

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Commodore
Amiga 600

The Amiga 600, launched after the A500+ was the first entry level model to have an integrated hard drive controller and PCMCIA slot. It offered little over the A500+ and was soon replaced by the more powerful A1200.

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Commodore
Amiga 600HD

Identical to the Amiga 600, this model came with a built in 20MB 2.5 inch hard drive. This was a much sleeker looking machine compared to the identical specced A500+ with A590 hard drive.

In order to use drives larger then 40MB requires Kickstart 37.350 or higher.

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Commodore
Amiga 600HD/40

The Amiga 600HD/40 was the top of the range 600 boasting the largest built in hard drive. These machines were very rare, most 600s were sold without hard drive, some with 20MB but the 40 was hardly ever sold. And of these 40MB models very few were labeled 600HD/40 like this one.

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Commodore
Amiga 1000

The very first Amiga. This started the revolution. Originally developed by Amiga Inc, eventually sold to Commodore. This machine uses a RAM based Kickstart; which needs to be loaded from floppy at every cold boot.

US Version, this machine has no Commodore logo.

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Commodore
Amiga 1000

After selling Amiga Inc to Commodore the first (US) A1000s were sold without a Commodore brand logo. This european, slightly later model has the Commodore brand stamped on the front. The slanted A (Amiga) key was replaced by a C= key.

Later european model, this has Commodore stamped on the front.

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Commodore
Amiga 1000

This Amiga 1000 is retrofitted with the Phoenix replacement motherboard.

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Commodore
Amiga 1000


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Commodore
Amiga 1000

Very early Amiga 1000 model (110volts/NTSC) which has the boingball logo (also on the keyboard). This logo was only used on the first Amiga 1000's, it was later replaced by the colored checkmark.

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Commodore
Amiga 1200

The Amiga 1200 was the entry level AGA machine. It offered an integrated IDE controller, a clockport expansion socket and a PCMCIA interface. Based on a 68ec020 CPU and 2MB chipram it offered a performance boost compared to the Amiga 600 series. (Commodore produced machine)

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Amiga Technologies
Amiga 1200

The Amiga Technologies version of the Amiga 1200 came with or without an HD. Small modifications include adjustments to the mainboard to accomodate normal PC floppy drives. These drives are not 100% with trackloading games.

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Commodore
Amiga 1200

Commodore UK was great at creating packs, this Amiga 1200 comes in the Computer Combat pack.

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Commodore
Amiga 1200

Placeholder for my Kickstarter case machine :)

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Amiga Technologies
Amiga 1200HD

After Commodores bankcrupty and production being halted for a few years, Escom took over production. These Amiga technologies machines are pratically identical, using much of C= old stock. They do however often come with modified PC floppy drives.

Original Amiga Magic package with stock 120MB drive. Never opened!

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Commodore
Amiga 1200HD/40

The 1200HD/40 is identical to the normal 1200, apart from the fact this machine came factory standard with a 40MB hard drive. (Commodore produced machine)

Clean, white condition. Warranty seal still intact!

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Commodore
Amiga 1500

Sold only in the united kingdom the Amiga 1500 was basically a normal Amiga 2000 but with two floppy drives. Commodore UK put this machine to market against the Checkmate 1500, which was basically just a desktop casing for the A500. This system was cheaper then a normal 2000 and was targeted at a younger public.

Rev. 6.2 mainboard, Kickstart switch 1.3/2.0/3.0

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Commodore
Amiga 1500


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Commodore
Amiga 2000A

The Amiga 2000A is the first A2000, designed in Germany. These models offer less then the later B, or CR versions. This is basically an A1000 in a bigger box with the first version of Zorro slots.

Rev. 4 Mainboard

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Commodore
Amiga 2000B

Early prototype of a CR 2000 (West Chester model)

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Commodore
Amiga 2000B

The Amiga 2000 is an Amiga 500 in a much larger box with seperate keyboard and lots of expansion capabilities. It offered a CPU slot, a Video Slot, 5 Zorro II slots and 4 XT slots. Many machines were sold with a so called bridgeboard, offering DOS compatibility.

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Commodore
Amiga 2000B

The Amiga 2000 is an Amiga 500 in a much larger box with seperate keyboard and lots of expansion capabilities. It offered a CPU slot, a Video Slot, 5 Zorro II slots and 4 XT slots. Many machines were sold with a so called bridgeboard, offering DOS compatibility.

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Commodore
Amiga 2000HD

The Amiga 2000HD was bundled with an A2091 SCSI controller and a 20 or 40MB Harddrive. Early models were bundled with the A2090 controller.

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Commodore
Amiga 2500

The Amiga 2500 is a 2000 which came with an A2620 accelerator and a 2090 or 2091 SCSI controller. This is an early model with rev 4.4 motherboard, A2090 MFM/SCSI controller, A2620 68020 CPU card and an A25000 2MB Zorro FastRAM card.

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Commodore
Amiga 2500/30

The Amiga 2500/030 came was an enhanced version of the 2500 which came with an A2630 accelerator and a 2091 SCSI controller.

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Commodore
Amiga 2500UX

The Amiga 2500UX is the rarest of the Amiga Unix machines. There are a lot less of these made compared to the A3000UX. Based on a standard 2500, A2620 or A2630 and an A2091 SCSI controller.

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Commodore
Amiga 3000

The 3000 offered a range of improvements. These include an integrated Flicker Fixer which allowed the use of standard VGA monitors. It also came with 4 Zorro III slots on a backplane, an integrated SCSI controller and a 68030 CPU at 16 or 25Mhz.

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Commodore
Amiga 3000

Early revision A3000, clocked at 16Mhz.

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Commodore
Amiga 3000T

The Amiga 3000, while technically not much different to a regular 3000 utilised a huge mainboard and offered way more expansion space then its desktop sister. This baby is big and very, very heavy!

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Commodore
Amiga 3000T040

The A3000T which was sold with the A3640 Accelerator was marked "040". Otherwise the machine is identical to the A3000T. Usually they have no onboard 68030/68882.

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Commodore
Amiga 3000UX

Hardware-wise identical to the Amiga 3000, the UX came with a modified version of AT&T Unix SRV4. Standard options included the A2410 GFX card, the A2065 Ethernet controller and the A3070 tape drive. The latter was actually required to install Unix.

Running Amiga Unix v2.1P1

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Commodore
Amiga 3500

This is a very rare prototype Amiga 3500. Later called the Amiga 3000T, this particular machine has the casing of a PC60-III. Because of this it has one more 5.25inch drive bay and has the same disk drives as the Amiga 2000. Funny enough it did not have a T added to the model name, as the later 3000T did.

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Commodore
Amiga 4000

Rev. B is the most common version A4000. It offered 4 Zorro III slots and was sold with either an 030 or an 040 CPU card. 2MB Chip ram and 16MB Fast ram is possible by using standard Simm modules. IDE controller integrated on the mainboard. Came standard with a High Density Floppy drive.

Buster rev 9

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Commodore
Amiga 4000

This machine has a rare revision 2 mainboard. The machine is identical to a normal revision B, but the silkscreen on the mainboard is different.

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Commodore
Amiga 4000cr Rev. D

The Cost Reduced version of the A4000 actually offered some interesting improvements. These include Chip Mem integrated on mainboard, Lithium battery (no leaking!), external battery connector and most importantly an integrated 68ec030 CPU and socket for a 68882 FPU.

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Commodore
Amiga 4000cr Rev. D

This specific version of the CR model has no 68030 onboard, instead it was sold with an A3640 with 68LC040 CPU. Machine is in very good, clean working order.

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Amiga Technologies
Amiga 4000T

According to many the flagship Amiga. It offered integrated IDE, SCSI, 5 Zorro slots, 2 Video Slots, Standard AT style case, Lithium Battery and Audio/Video and Disks/IO on seperate modules. Only 200 were sold by Commodore, later production was continued by Amiga Technologies.

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Amiga Technologies
Amiga 4000T

My second A4000T. I ran into this machine on a website for a fair price, bought it to turn it into a US spec machine. It is now running in NTSC so I can use the Video Toaster & Flyer cards.

Machine running in NTSC for Video Editing

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